Assemblies of God SearchSite GuideStoreContact Us
Current_issue
Subscribe
Spanish
Daily_Boost
Previous_issues
Key_Bearers
Weekly_drawing
Conversations
Guard_your_heart
Bible_reading_guide
ABCs_of_salvation
Questions_Answers
Who_we_are
Staff
speakers
PE_Books
Contact_us
Links
Home

2009 Conversations


2008 Conversations


2007 Conversations


2006 Conversations


2005 Conversations


Benji creator Joe Camp: Moral movies, personal cost (12/26/04)

Gloria Gaither: A Gaither family Christmas(12/19/04)

Allyson Feliz: Olympic medalist  shares passion for following Christ (12/12/04)

Dan Dean: Walking by faith (11/28/04)

J. Don George: Every church can touch the poor (11/21/04)

Brock Gill: Jesus is no illusion (11/14/04)

Ted Dekker: Good, evil and the battle for souls (10/31/04)

Bob Kilpatrick: CCM: Growing and changing (10/17/04)

Eugene H. Peterson: Man with a message (10/10/04)

Caz McCaslin: Fixing kids sports (9/26/04)

Jerry B. Jenkins: A novel approach to evangelism (9/19/04)

Natalie Grant: Living the dream (9/12/04)

Sharon Ellard: A life-changing education (8/29/04)

Steven Curtis Chapman: All things new (8/22/04)

Jim Ryun: Running to Jesus (8/15/04)

George Barna: Today’s church: By the numbers (8/8/04)

Randy Singer: Made to count (7/25/04)

Holly McClure: Morality and the media (7/18/04)

Don Miller and Richard Flory:Taking the Church to today's culture (7/11/04)

Cecil Richardson: Pastoring the Air Force’s 'Pastors' (6/27/04)

Barry Meguiar: Driven by faith (6/20/04)

Thomas E. Trask: Concerned for America (6/13/04)

Dr. David Yonggi Cho: The work of the Holy Spirit (5/30/04)

Tom Greene: High school: A great mission field (5/16/04)

Jennifer Rothschild: Walk by faith, not by sight (5/9/04)

Chaplain Alex Taylor: Forgiveness and restoration (4/25/04)

Joshua Harris: Not even a hint (4/18/04)

Nicky Cruz: Changing America (4/11/04)

Jason Schmidt: Lessons learned on life’s field (3/28/04)

Scott Temple: One church, many colors (3/21/04)

Michael W. Smith: Called to worship (3/14/04)

Representative Jo Ann Davis: Christians in politics (2/29/04)

Darlene Zschech: Sing, shout … just shout the praise the Lord (2/22/04)

Surgeon James W Long: For your heart’s sake, get fit (2/15/04)

Jerry R. Kirk: Battling pornography (2/8/04)

Dr Michael Ferris: A choice to heal (1/18/04)

Chaplain Al Worthley: Outside the four walls of the church (1/11/04)


2003 Conversations


2002 Conversations


2001 Conversations

Walk by faith, not by sight

When disease stole Jennifer Rothschild’s sight at 15, her dreams of being a commercial artist came crashing down. The Miami, Fla., native might have given up. Instead, she turned to God for the strength and will to go on. Today, Rothschild is an accomplished author, speaker and recording artist. She recently released her second book, Touched by His Unseen Hand (Multnomah, 2004). Rothschild and her husband, Philip, have two sons, Clayton and Connor. She spoke recently with Assistant Editor Ashli O’Connell.

PE: Your dreams had to change dramatically when you lost your sight. How did you find the path to where you are now?

ROTHSCHILD: It found me. When I received Christ, I was totally captivated. My natural response as I walked through my teenage years was just abandonment toward Him. I never sought to achieve anything like writing or singing. They occurred as a result of my walk with Him.

The ministry we receive is from God for us to become His hands. We can’t take credit for it. I do believe in stewardship, though. I believe God has trusted me with this position, and I want to walk humbly and be a good steward of the opportunity. But I don’t ever want to take ownership of what God has done.

PE: What’s the message of your new book?

ROTHSCHILD: We all feel overwhelmed sometimes. We’ve got pressures and circumstances that can deplete us. I want readers to know that there is One who wants to overwhelm us in a different way. God wants to overwhelm us with His touch. While we all know how important human touch is, I try to show how God has touched us throughout the ages, and today. His touch has rescued us and empowered us to live a life of abundance.

It plays nicely off the foundation I laid with my first book, Lessons I Learned in the Dark, in which I encouraged readers to walk by faith and not by sight. I wrote Touched by His Unseen Hand from the vantage point that, though I cannot physically see, the eyes of my heart have been enlightened so that I can see God’s invisible fingerprints.

PE: Do you think you would have that insight if you were not blind?

ROTHSCHILD: God has used blindness to help me see things that are invisible — to look beyond the surface and have an eternal, rather than temporal, perspective.

PE: People might assume that blindness is your greatest obstacle. Is that true?

Lessons I Learned in
the Dark

Jennifer Rothschild and Beth Moore
#03TQ6104

Touched by His
Unseen Hand

Jennifer Rothschild
#03TQ6105

To order, click here or call
1-800-641-4310

ROTHSCHILD: My greatest obstacle is more universal. It has to do with my attitude and perspective. Blindness just gives me an opportunity to be more acquainted with the choices I have — to be better or bitter, grateful or angry, to persevere or to quit. Those are not blindness issues, but attitude issues.

PE: What have your sons taught you about life?

ROTHSCHILD: My youngest is 5. About two years ago he began to understand that I couldn’t see. One day the lady that helps me, Miss Pat, was driving him home from school. Connor was still trying to figure out what it means to be blind. He asked, “Why doesn’t Mommy drive me home from school?”

Miss Pat said, “You know why, Connor. It’s because your mommy is blind.”

Connor said, “Oh yeah, that’s right. She walks by faith and not by sight.” That’s just an example of what they’ve taught me: not to complicate the truth, just to live it out with simplicity and trust.

PE: What advice do you have for mothers of children with disabilities?

ROTHSCHILD: My mother had courage. Many times she made me do things I didn’t want to do. She helped me risk things I didn’t want to risk. That instilled a tenacity I’m not sure I would have had otherwise. One of the greatest struggles for a mother is to know how to balance her sense of protectiveness with courage. Her courage will create courage in her child. And that’s really what she wants — a child who is able to face the world with independence and trust.

E-mail your comments to pe@ag.org.

E-mail this page to a friend.
©1999-2009 General Council of the Assemblies of God